Teaching Primary Students Ordinal Positions, Sequence, and Logic

paper doll chains coverI absolutely love to incorporate logic into math whenever possible, so when a friend told me she was teaching ordinal positions and sequencing, I couldn’t resist creating something for her to use with her students!  What better way to teach ordinal positions and sequence than paper doll chains!  I had so much fun creating this packet of 28 paper doll chain puzzlers.  They range from three doll chains to five doll chains.  The kids use the clues on the task cards and colored paper doll cards to create the paper doll chain in the correct sequence.  The cards require the kids to use some logic to figure them out which makes it all the more fun! The task cards come in two versions, one with the ordinal position under each paper doll, and one without the ordinal position.  This allows you to differentiate the activity according to the needs of the students in your class.  You can also start the kids out doing the puzzles with the ordinal positions on them, and then once they are proficient, they can move to the task cards without the ordinal positions.

Because I’m so conscious of the cost of colored ink, I made the task cards in black and white and only the individual paper doll cards are in color. There is a recording sheet for kids to color in or just write the color letters for each paper doll chain.    These puzzles are great for your math center.    They’re  designed for kids in grades 1-3, but I do know one 4th grade teacher who wanted to use them and her kiddos loved them.  They’re especially great for those early finishers in your classroom!

Here are a couple of pictures of what the center and cards would actually look like

You can find this packet at my Teachers Pay Teachers store.  If you click on the cover graphic, it will take you directly to the product page.

Well, that is all for now!  I have a fun new product which should be ready next week, so check back!  I also have a couple of freebies I will be posting this weekend which I hope you can use with your students!

Remember to always…  Keep ’em thinking! 

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Let’s KENKEN!

kenkenI have discovered an absolutely wonderful website called KenKen.  People say KenKen’s are like Suduko puzzles on  steroids.  So exactly what is a KenKen?  It’s a numerical puzzles that uses the four basic math operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication,  and division.  The puzzle is laid out on a grid  ranging from 3 by 3 to 9 by 9.  Also, they are available for different levels of complexity.  The most basic use only one operation (addition) and then they add subtraction, and the number of grids can also change.   The great thing about using these puzzles with your students is that it helps improve their math and  logic skills.

If you go to the website www.kenken.com, you will find  lots of KenKen puzzles ready for you to download for your kids.  They even have a version that can be played online, a mobile app, and if that isn’t enough, you can sign up to have a new sets of KenKen puzzles delivered to you by email each week!  Many of the gifted teachers in my system have a KenKen center in  their classroom.  But be careful, they’re addicting!  The kiddos can’t seem to get enough of them.  If you click under the section for teachers, they have a pdf file you can send home to teach your kiddo’s parents how to KenKen as well.  So check it out and have fun while challenging your mind and boosting your brain power!

That’s all  for  now!  Remember to always… Keep ’em Thinking!

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Teaching Logic to Primary Students

I believe teaching students how to think logically is so very important.  Logical thinking developes skills in problem solving, making inferences, drawing conclusions, recognizing similarities and differences, and comparing and contrasting.  I have always used matrix logic puzzles with my students to introduce them to logical thinking.  I think matric puzzles are one of the easiest ways to introduce logic problems.  I have seen many resources that simply give the problem and clues, but there is no matrix.  The matrix is critical to helping students understand the reasoning involved in solving the problems.   For example, if you answer “yes” on a column or row, all the other squares on the column or row should have “no” answers.

To help primary students learn how to develop logical reasoning, I have developed a set of 25 logic problems around a Christmas theme. What better way to get kids excited about logic! There are different levels of difficulty, to provide opportunities to differentiate for the varying ability levels in your classroom.  The matrix logic puzzles begin with 2 X 2 grid puzzles and progress to 3 X 3 grid puzzles; however, once the students are exposed to the puzzles, everyone should be able to complete all of them.  I suggest beginning with the easiest puzzles as a group activity to develop practice and confidence in solving matrix logic puzzles.  They print out beautifully in grayscale so you don’t use color ink.

There are so many ways you can use these in your classroom – as a group activity in the morning for a problem of the day activity, in a center, or activities for those earlier finishers.

Here’s what you will get:

  • 25 puzzles in all (6 Christmas Sudoku picture puzzles and 19 matrix logic puzzles)
  • Candy cards for Sudoku picture puzzles
  • Yes/no cards for logic puzzles
  • Answer keys
  • Sheets to record responses

Click on the preview below to see these puzzles and to download a preview!

primarily christmas logic preview

Remember to always Keep ’em Thinking! – Susan Morrow

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